Tsukiji Fish Market Diary

November 30, 2016

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Even though I grew up in Tokyo, I never had the opportunity to visit Tsukiji Market until now. In recent years, it became such a popular tourists spot, and I’ve wanted to check it out before they move into a new property in Toyosu. (There are severals problems Tokyo is currently facing with this issue tho…)

Usually, it is suggested to go there as early as 6 am to watch the Market action happening right in front of your eyes, but if you just want to visit and look around, I think 10 or 11 am should be just fine. However, if you are thinking of having fresh sushi for brunch, expect 2 to 3 hours wait at some of these popular restaurants within the Tsukiji Market.

My overall experience at Tsukiji Market was unique and exciting. Japan has one of the richest food cultures in the world and gratitudes towards blessing of nature goes a long way. Before and after the meal, we put our hands together and say “itadakimasu” (before) and “gochisousamadeshita.” (after)

This is to show respect and gratitudes towards nature’s blessings and all the lives that sacrificed to be on the table and to whoever prepared this meal. I never thought about this custom at all until I came to the U.S. but I find it quite beautiful. There is nothing like it. In English, it can be translated to something like “Let’s eat!” or “Let’s dig in!” but nothing shows gratitudes and respects towards chefs nor to the ingredients itself. At the market, you can see those spirits everywhere by fishermen to workers and chefs. Not to waste anything, to the bones to the skins and guts. It was fascinating just to see fresh Japanese seafood, delicacy, and the liveliness of the market, but I can also tell some of the regulars and handlers were not too happy about the market becoming such a touristy spot. I saw similar problems at Boqueria Market in Barcelona as well. When the market becomes so popular, they benefit some significant traffic and exposures but also face some conflicts since Market has to function and people get in the way and taking pictures and not making any purchases, etc. Fishermen especially can be pretty blunt and maybe not the friendliest people at first, but like anything as long as you pay them respect and gratitude, they might open up to you eventually.

去年のことになりますが、東京で育ったにもかかわらず、今の今まで私は築地マーケットに行ったことがありませんでした。今でこそ豊洲の盛り土問題など色々ありますが、去年の時点では移転する前にぜひ行っておきたいという、お友達と一緒にいざ築地へ!

競りを見たい人は朝6時とかから行くのを進められたりしますが(本当は4時とか、もっと早いのかな?)時差ボケの我々一行は10時くらいにノロノロ出かけてみましたが、それでも十分楽しめました。中でも印象的だったのは、漁師さんたちの丁寧な扱い方。海外に出て、初めて思ったのですが、食事の前に手を合わせ「いただきます」「ごちそうさまでした」という、この習慣。私たちにとっては何気ない普通のことですが、英語では “Let’s eat!”や”Let’s dig in!”など、食べ物や作ってくれた人たちに敬意を払うことに値するような言葉はありません。これは本当に誇れるべき美しい習慣と文化の賜物だと思います。そういった日本人らしい生き物に対する敬意と感謝の念が漁師さんたちのお魚の扱いによく現れているよう思いました。何も無駄にせず、皮から頭から肝まで、美味しくいただく精神は本当に素晴らしく、我が国ながら誇らしくてたまりません。

私も最近知ったことで、少し脱線しますが、日本では常識の「活け締め」(活魚を麻痺させて素早く脳死状態とした後にさらに血抜きをし、鮮度を保つ方法)。これも日本発祥で今では世界中で行われているそうですが、このすごい技術とこだわりは世界中で群を抜いていると思います。こうした素晴らしい文化と技術に囲まれて育った私たちは本当に幸せなことだな、と改めて感じます。

ただ少し残念というか複雑な気持ちになったのは、物珍しくて来る観光の人たちに対する漁師さんや買い付けに来られる常連の方などのあからさまな態度はちょっと気になりました。ものすごい数の観光客で賑わう(とりわけレストラン周辺)様子は正直私もびっくりしましたが、市場として機能するためには時にそういった観光客の人が邪魔だったりすることもあるのでしょう。ましてや、習慣や文化の違う外国の方だったりすると素手で触ってしまったり、通路の真ん中を遮ったままだったり、など。同じような光景をバルセロナのボケリア市場でも目にしました。観光スポットとして人気のあまり、写真を撮るだけで買い物をしないお客さんが多くて困っているのだとか。市場側としたら、人気が出て嬉しいでしょうけど、少し複雑ですよね。また日本の漁師さんは職人気質でぶっきらぼうな方も多いので、びっくりする人もいるかもしれませんが、マナーを守り敬意と感謝の念を忘れなければきっと少しは温かく接してくれるかもしれませんね。

 

Follow my blog with Bloglovin