Old Jewish Cemetery

August 27, 2015

Visiting the Old Jewish Cemetery was one of the most memorable part about this trip. Prague being so pretty and romantic in Spring time surrounded by beautiful nature and architectures, it was so surreal to have come into this little pocket of quietness. This second largest Jewish cemetery in Europe lies in Josehov, in Jewish quarter of Prague. The cemetery was founded in the 15 th century, the oldest existing gravestone dates back to 1439. Apparently it is among the top ten cemeteries to visit around the world according to National Geographic magazine.

When you walk into the cemetery you will be shocked to the number of tombstones layered together just lying. It is nothing you ever seen in a cemetery. At least it was for me.

Although there isn’t an accurate number but it has been estimated that there are approximately 12,000 tombstones presently visible, and there may be as many as 100,000 burials in all. It’s not stated very clearly as to why tombs are layered and squeezed in tangle on wikipedia nor on other websites but there are notes on how Nazis had used Jewish grave stones as slabs for sidewalks. Also in Jewish culture,  it is strictly forbidden to dig out buried corpses, the tombs were squeezed in or even piled up on several layers. Hence the oldest tombs appear next to the newest ones in a disorderly tangle.

One of the images that struck to me the most is where tombstones that are not related, even from different generations are standing side by side, almost leaning onto someone’s shoulder. It made me think of how people rely on each other and support one another. Coping to live strongly in this beautiful nature even after your passing. By the time you leave, you find so much beauty in this chaotic disorder.

Visiting cemeteries makes you think a lot about histories, cultures and our ancestors. We may come from different cultures or backgrounds but we are one as humankind, we will also be part of history one day. What can we learn from history? In many ways cemeteries are the place to be in touch with part of our history.

この旅で一番印象的だったのは、旧ユダヤ人墓地を訪れたときのこと。春のプラハは自然や美しい建築に囲まれて、とにかく綺麗で、ロマンティックだったため、この静まり返った異空間に来たときは、あまりに現実と懸け離れた不思議な感覚でした。ヨーロッパでも二番目に古いこの旧ユダヤ人墓地はヨゼフォフと呼ばれるプラハのユダヤ人地区に位置します。墓地は15世紀に設立され、一番古い墓石に至っっては1439年にまで遡ると言われているそうです。また雑誌、ナショナルジオグラフィックによれば、世界で訪問すべき墓地トップ10に入っているそう。

まず最初に墓地に足を踏み入れて、一番ショックを受けるのはとにかく無造作に積み重ねられた、その墓石の数。今まで見たことのあるような墓地とはあまりにもかけ離れていたから。少なくとも私にとっては。

正確な数については明確ではないものの、現時点で目に見えて約12,000の墓石が存在すると推定されていて、埋葬されている者たちも数えると、その数は10万にものぼるそう。この墓地がなぜこのように無造作に積み上げられているかについては、wikipediaや他のサイトでもあまり明確ではないのだけど、以前ナチスが歩道などにユダヤ人の墓石を使用していたという証言もあるとか。またユダヤ文化では、一度埋葬された死体を掘り起こすことは厳密に禁止されているため、墓石はぎゅうぎゅうに詰められ、何層にも重ねられたそう。そのため、最も古い墓石の横に比較的新しい墓石が横たわったりする無秩序な状態になっているんだそう。

中でも一番印象に残っているのは、家族でもない、違うジェネレーションの墓石同士が、まるで肩を寄せ合っているように建っていること。まるで誰かの肩に寄りかかり、お互いを助け合うような。そしてこの世から身体が滅びたあとも、美しい自然と共存しているこの墓地。最初はカオスに見えるこの無秩序な墓地も、帰るころにはその美しさに感動さえ覚えていました。

どんな墓地を訪れる時もそうなのだけど、いつもよりもっと歴史や文化、そしてご先祖様について考えさせられます。違う文化や背景から来ていても、最終的にみんな同じ「人間」で、私たちもいずれ歴史の一部になる。歴史から何を学びとれるか?色々な意味で、お墓は我々が築いてきた歴史とどうやって向き合っていくのか考えるのに適した場所、そんな風に思います。

Follow my blog with Bloglovin